F6 Project

Nikon Issues Recall of 152 F6’s

No, Nikon is not ceasing production of the F6. Rather, Nikon has issued a partial recall of 152 Nikon F6's manufactured or sold after July 22, 2019. For the time being, the recall only affects the following serial number'ed cameras: 16 years and still going strong,...

Praying for Our Park

When we came back over Trail Ridge after a pleasant day in the mountains and saw this Big Horn Ram on his knees licking water from moss on the tundra, it seemed especially apropos. “He looks like he’s praying,” my wife said. Through the orange haze caused by the looming fire it seemed fitting to ascribe Colorado’s official animal and sentinel of the high country with the responsibility of praying for the Park we all love and hold dear.

Lincoln Highway, part 2 (Kodak Ektachrome E100)

Don’t be afraid of Kodak Ektachrome E100. While true – it’s not Velvia or Provia, it absolutely stands on its own merits as an excellent option for chrome film shooters looking for a true-to-life color, excellent resolution & sharpness and virtually grain free film. Paired with the F6’s virtually infallible meter, you can not go wrong with E100.

Lincoln Highway

Traveling back and forth between Colorado and Illinois for as many years as I have, it can we a welcome diversion to get off the Interstate and travel two-lane and back roads instead. Most of the time I’m in no particular hurry, allowing me to wander slowly through the mid-west’s matrix of gravel roads at low speeds, looking for anything of interest to cause me to stop.

Social Distancing

With this newly imposed normal of social distancing, turning it into a glass half full situation may not be as difficult as first seemed.

Praying for Our Park

When we came back over Trail Ridge after a pleasant day in the mountains and saw this Big Horn Ram on his knees licking water from moss on the tundra, it seemed especially apropos. “He looks like he’s praying,” my wife said. Through the orange haze caused by the looming fire it seemed fitting to ascribe Colorado’s official animal and sentinel of the high country with the responsibility of praying for the Park we all love and hold dear.

Lincoln Highway, part 2 (Kodak Ektachrome E100)

Don’t be afraid of Kodak Ektachrome E100. While true – it’s not Velvia or Provia, it absolutely stands on its own merits as an excellent option for chrome film shooters looking for a true-to-life color, excellent resolution & sharpness and virtually grain free film. Paired with the F6’s virtually infallible meter, you can not go wrong with E100.

Lincoln Highway

Traveling back and forth between Colorado and Illinois for as many years as I have, it can we a welcome diversion to get off the Interstate and travel two-lane and back roads instead. Most of the time I’m in no particular hurry, allowing me to wander slowly through the mid-west’s matrix of gravel roads at low speeds, looking for anything of interest to cause me to stop.

Arches National Park, January 2020, part 2

Winter is a great time to visit Arches National Park in Utah. Crowds are light and the beauty is surreal. This is a short report of what I saw this past January while on a quick get away to one of America’s true National Treasures.

Arches National Park, January 2020 – part I

If you want to see Canyonlands minus the crowds, try visiting in January. This past Winter jaunt to Moab, Utah was without question one of the most uniquely beautiful visits I’ve experienced in 30+ years.

The Value of Unique Pictures? 

“Yes. To explain, allow me to exaggerate a bit. With a digital camera, the number of pictures you can take is infinite, in the sense that there is no limit in the number of shots to take, unlike shooting with film. You don’t have to hesitate when taking pictures. Just release the shutter, although later, you may find that you don’t want to keep the results.

Certainly, we experience this carefree ease when shooting with a digital camera.

Exactly. But, on the contrary, some photographers reject the prospect of such ease, as they desire a more careful, rigorous approach to taking pictures. They want to treasure each picture-taking opportunity by etching their vision on film.

So, with the F6, we made it our first priority to satisfy customers who want to apply a certain degree of respect to taking each great picture. To realize this, a camera that allows a user to take a good picture is not enough. There are many important factors involved, including comfort of use, functionality as a tool, shooting feel, etc. And we want to make the F6 the best camera in every aspect.”

Praying for Our Park

Praying for Our Park

Hallett Peak, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado [Kodak E100G-expired] This past week we had the privilege of visiting Rocky Mountain National Park again, this time on a Timed Entry Permit secured for my birthday. Anyone who has read through...

The F6 Project is an attempt to hop off the relentless, speeding train of “technological progress” and take a step back.

Years from now, when the infatuation with megapixels has run its course and the film market has somehow managed to grow – despite all odds –  a film Renaissance will rumble through the pile of DSLR and mirrorless castaways in our land fills. People will scour the web in search of the answer to their question, ‘what happened to my love and joy of photography?”  Just maybe they’ll stumble across this web site, in what ever iteration it’s in – and find renewed inspiration to explore the world of film photography.

To you I extend a warm welcome, inviting you to explore the unique, wonderful and even romantic side of film photography as it once was, and could be again with this fine instrument. Welcome back.

Technical

The Nikon F6 35mm camera is the most technically advanced film camera ever made. Understanding what makes it special is the primary purpose of this section. So put your Tech on and dive in.

Inspiration

Possessing the most sophisticated 35mm film camera ever made is great and all, but what to create with it? This section is focused on inspiration.

Be prepared to be inspired by what others are creating with the Nikon F6.

If you’re shooting film these days, you’re probably interested in scanning too. Getting the film image into the computer isn’t rocket science, but there are a few things you may be interested in.

Howdy from Colorado, USA

You’ve landed on the mother-load of information about the greatest 35mm film camera ever made, the Nikon F6. As digital cameras progress to staggering levels of sophistication (and in many cases, cost), somehow – right along side – the use of film continues to rise, and even accelerate.

What’s New?

You’re lookin’ at it. The F6 Project 3.0 is here, back from the jaws of death. O.K., maybe a little melodramatic… but after 10+ years he’s still kickin’. I want to say a sincere thank you to a certain someone responsible from talking sense into me when I was thinking of throwing in the towel. You know who you are. Thank you.

Old Growth

One of the big changes for me creatively since the beginning of the F6 Project is developing my own black and white film again, . Ironic, I know, to have such a colorful image behind this topic. Who says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks? More about that here

Today’s photographer has more creative options to explore than any other time in history. What a great time to dive in, shoot film, learn to develop both color and black and white, then print old school in a darkroom – or – on one of the high-quality inkjet printers available.

Other Efforts

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